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Der Jane Austen Club

Der Jane Austen Club Inhaltsangabe & Details

Sylvias Mann hat sie verlassen, ohne dass es offensichtliche Beziehungsprobleme gab. Da Bernadette nicht weiter mit ansehen will, wie ihre Freundin schlecht drauf ist, gründet sie kurzerhand den Jane-Austen-Buchclub. Ebenfalls dabei sind Sylvias. Der Jane Austen Club ist ein amerikanisches Liebesdrama aus dem Jahr Dem Film der Regisseurin Robin Swicord liegt der Bestseller-Roman der. Der Jane Austen Club: Roman | Fowler, Karen Joy, Ingendaay, Marcus | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf​. camdencreate.co - Kaufen Sie Der Jane Austen Club günstig ein. Qualifizierte Bestellungen werden kostenlos geliefert. Sie finden Rezensionen und Details zu einer. Der Jane Austen Club ein Film von Robin Swicord mit Maria Bello, Amy Brenneman. Inhaltsangabe: Fünf Freundinnen kämpfen mit ihren Liebesproblemen.

Der Jane Austen Club

Die drei Freundinnen beschliessen, einen Buchclub zu gründen, um noch einmal die Romane von Jane Austen zu lesen. Auch Sylvias Tochter Allegra, die. Scopri Der Jane Austen Club di Karen Joy Fowler, Marcus Ingendaay: spedizione gratuita per i clienti Prime e per ordini a partire da 29€ spediti da Amazon. der jane austen club buch. Is this chick lit? If I had of read this when I orginally brought it back when I was 18 I check this out think it would have been anywhere near as appealing to me as it was now, reading source when I'm https://camdencreate.co/neue-filme-stream-deutsch/lemony-snicket-serie.php Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Dart Wm Spielplan. Palo Alto was much more sophisticated than Bloomington. Recommended to Dawn Michelle https://camdencreate.co/online-filme-schauen-stream/das-leben-danach-film.php Saw it in a bookstore and bought it for the husband.

This book is boring and obnoxious. Bernadette's Austen was a comic genius. Her characters, her dialogue remained genuinely funny, not like Shakespeare's jokes, which amused you only because they were Shakespeare's and you owed him that.

Talking trash about Shakespeare?? View all 6 comments. I've read the very negative reviews of this there are many and I have to say, I think a lot of people just didn't get this book.

They wanted it to be plot-driven and fun as so many Austen take-offs are , but this book is much more character-driven and contemplative.

I learned a lot about Jane Austen from it especially from the back matter and it was a great way to continue to explore her work.

It's also so gratifying for me to read about people who live for and through literature. The cha I've read the very negative reviews of this there are many and I have to say, I think a lot of people just didn't get this book.

The characters all seemed real to me. I enjoyed their back stories, their foibles, the glimpses into their psyches.

Though not the most enthralling novel, this contains many little everyday life stories that are memorable and full of meaning.

To explain my favorite part of the book, I'll have to go into spoiler territory. As you may know, the best thing about Persuasion is the love letter Wentworth sends to Anne in the end.

Is there anything better than a great love letter? You're not totally stupid, but you're super annoying and married to someone who's probably too good for you.

Also, you are way too interested in young men. You're so together and sensible. But it seems like you're so worried about other people's happiness that you're going to let your own slip by the wayside.

So annoying. You are not perfect! You try to be good and somehow end up making me really dislike you. Girl, you crazy. Even though you're the life of the party, you seem bound to end up with a dullsville mate.

I know Bernadette is old and Emma is young, but they both think they're the queen and we're the sorry people. So likable and clever with weird taste in women.

That's probably why the book got three stars instead of four. So good. I'm craving Jane Austen now. I just want to go through each novel in order.

I just might. I can't decide. I am a quite reliable multi-tasker If you love Jane Austen, I think you will really appreciate the book.

Even if you don't love Jane Austen, I think you will appreciate the book and maybe come to appreciate Jane Austen more.

It was really good. Four Hello Kittys. My favorite Jane Austen book is Pride and Prejudice. I heart Lizzy Bennet and Mr. I'm dying to hear what any one else's favorite Austen is.

She's such a master with characters and keen observer of relationships. I love her. One of my favorite classes I took in grad school was on Jane Austen.

Besides my poetry classes, it's probably the one class I remember quite vividly and am most fond of. I wrote a great paper on Jane Austen paper dolls.

I finished Fowler's novel this evening by our outdoor fireplace. FD got a really perfect fire going; he used some of our applewood we bought last fall from a local orchard.

We smell woodsy and wholesome and happy. Very simply happy. When the fire got low, our neighbor boy Joe, crept between the pines in our backyards, apologized for interrupting my reading and asked if he and his brother could get me more wood.

It was really sweet. I thanked him and told him it was sweet, but we were letting it burn out. He crept back between the trees and continued playing.

It was such a small act, but it really made my night. Tonight has been on those nights where everything feels good and perfect and calm.

Everything feels full of love and goodness. We had a hearty meal, a glowing fire, fine reading, quiet conversations, good neighbors.

It was one of those precious nights that if you don't record it becomes lost in all the hum-drum of the quick days that slide by. It was an evening worthy to share.

I had hoped it would be a kind of "fun" read, especially since I am a Jane-ite. Unfortunately for me, it wasn't much fun. I actually found it a little tedious and the jumping around from character POV to character POV, but not really getting inside their heads was annoying.

Austen does this and does it well Fowler, not so much. The story lacked cohesiveness Of course, one of the book club topics was plot and women writers.

Nyuck, nyuck. I suppose I'm not urbane enough at this point in my life to know if this was supposed to be ironically funny.

But you have to be a certain kind of writer to pull this off Fowler didn't do this for me. If you're a fellow Jane-ite, it might be fun to read the book and the character's corresponding views on all things Austen This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers.

To view it, click here. Underdeveloped plot, and underdeveloped characters - it seemed as though she just threw things in the story line as she wrote it.

However there were some good bits - the Jane Austen Magic 8 ball was an original idea for one. I'd buy one. It was a good plot idea, I'll give her that, but I thought it was poorly executed.

I think the thing that put off the most was how it was written - for the most part - in third person, yet there was an annoying constant use of 'we'.

I thought the romance between G Underdeveloped plot, and underdeveloped characters - it seemed as though she just threw things in the story line as she wrote it.

I thought the romance between Grigg and Jocelyn was arbitrary and just thrown in there because Fowler felt the need to include a heterosexual romance.

There was nothing to indicate anything between the two of them and I honestly do not feel that they are a good match.

The numerous flashbacks were overdone. I could have skipped over them and not really have missed anything.

The one character story line that I thought was really good was Allegra's. That one was well thought out and well done; the whole stealing her stories and making them stories idea seemed to fit with the theme of the novel somehow.

However, I did not like the fact that Allegra and Corrine got back together in the end. If it were me, I would not have forgaven Corrine.

I think I was disappointed because I was expecting it to be more 'book club' than 'flashbacks' - that's how it appeared from the back cover.

And the few short paragraphs that were 'book club' scenes were not at all interesting - it appeared that Fowler only included them so she could flaunt the fact that she knows all of Jane Austen's novels rather well.

It appears to be the same with Bernadette. She just didn't really do anything. View 2 comments. I bought this in a train station with the deliberate aim of reading a puff book.

I was not expecting a masterpiece, but this was absolute crap. I kept reading on the off chance that it might improve— it did not. The only redeeming quality of this book is that it is a really fast read since it's fluff.

I kept looking for fairly literal parallels in each chapter between the book under review and the character with which it was associated.

Not a very rewarding approach, although I did find some. Instead, I took this book as an implicit homage to Austen. A gently satirical portrayal of a group of characters bound partly, but not entirely, by a love of Austen's novels.

It's all about character; not plot. Not that much actually happens during the course of the book. Nevertheless, we learn a lot abo I kept looking for fairly literal parallels in each chapter between the book under review and the character with which it was associated.

Nevertheless, we learn a lot about this particular group of people and their relationships to each other. By the end of the book, I cared what happened to each of them.

Like Austen, Fowler is slyly funny at times, although I found her observations about the shortcomings of her characters to be a lot less pointed than Austen's.

Familiarity with Austen's work is marginally useful to an appreciation of this book, but certainly not necessary.

The characters and their stories stand on their own as an entertaining read. Recommended to Dawn Michelle by: Saw it in a bookstore and bought it for the husband.

Shelves: books-i-will-never-read-again. This book was really a disappointment to me. After all the hype I thought this would be a really great book.

And its not. Its an ok book, but not a great book. That is so funny and sad and poignant and touching. Everything this book was not.

It was a quick read and that was about it for me. It had some good moments, but it mostly fell flat for me and the end I don't even have words to describe it.

View all 3 comments. Read as part of my challenge to read my way around the world. I'd seen the movie a while back so I thought this book would more of the same.

Was I surprised! The movie seemed to only have a passing familiarity with this book. There was so much more in this book.

I especially liked the flashbacks of all the lives in the book. The mystery author and the description of the riot at the girls reform school that has to be put down by the National Guard were espe Read as part of my challenge to read my way around the world.

The mystery author and the description of the riot at the girls reform school that has to be put down by the National Guard were especially delightful.

This is only the second Karen Joy Fowler I've read. It makes me want to dig up her entire works and read them all!

I do love Fowler's work. But I have to say I found this book a disappointment. The story concerns the members of a Jane Austen book club--five women and one man--who meet to discuss the books.

The structure is thus roughly divided into six months, and each month one of the people leads the discussion while Fowler interweaves that person's life story into the discussion, often punctuated by quotes from Austen's books.

The prose is good, with a few eye-blinks My favorite line, from the Jocelyn sec I do love Fowler's work.

The prose is good, with a few eye-blinks My favorite line, from the Jocelyn section: "We are not the saints dogs are, but mothers are expected to come a close second.

With luck she would survive until college, when being likable became a plausible path to that. Kelly Link is acknowledged as a beta-reader; when I read the third section, and found yet again the tone was still the same, I realized the tone, the structural weaving, all made me feel like this story was somehow channeling Kelly Link.

There are times when Link, at least to my eye, seems to impose a monotone voice on her wonderful structural experiments.

The real problem, I realized, was arrived at during that same Prudie section, when we had quotes from Mansfield Park interspersed through the text.

Sometimes the quote seemed to echo back from the text, most of the time it didn't, but either way, every single quote, all of them known so very well I could peg them immediately, forced my mind back into the far more vivid imagery, characters, varying tone, of Austen's work.

These constant plunges back into MP finally unmoored me from this story and I kept struggling against the urge to put this book down and reread MP; I realized, after yet again consciously disengaging myself from MP and resolutely finding my place on the page that the club people had yet to come to life for me, subsumed as they were by Austen's novels constantly reinvoked.

Was it that sameness of tone? Was it the fact that we get glimpses, and only glimpses, into the subsidiary women far more than the men?

Was it that I was unable to perceive a meta-structure, a direction? I don't know, but finally it felt as if this book was cleverly following the patterns of fireflies while a glorious fire snapped and fooshed and radiated heat right behind them, constantly engaging not just my eye but all my senses while I tried to keep my eye on the fireflies.

I did enjoy the book discussions, but always found them far too brief, and that suggests to me that maybe I would have liked this book a lot more if I hadn't been so familiar with Austen.

The book discussions gradually became more interesting to me than the backstories, and I found myself wanting to argue with the characters instead of read their backgrounds.

I could see that Fowler was trying to show us how their backgrounds informed their opinions of Austen.

She gives us a heads-up on her theme right with the very first line: Each of us has a private Austen , echoing Martin Amis's wonderful quote: Jane Austen is weirdly capable of keeping everybody busy.

The moralists, the Eros-and-Agape people, the Marxists, the Freudians, the Jungians, the semioticians, the deconstructors--all find an adventure playground in six samey novels about middle-class provincials.

And for every generation of critics, and readers, her fiction effortlessly renews itself. Ah, the quotes. Finally, these were the best part of the book for me.

At the end, Fowler gives a precis of the novels leaving out Lady Susan which I found odd, as Northange r and Persuasion were also unpublished by Austen during her lifetime, so that can't be her criteria and those, frankly, drove me nuts.

In that playful tone she reduces complexities to bald statements. Henry then falls in love with shy Fanny. She refuses the advantageous match and, as punishment, is sent back to her parents.

Not even remotely right, it skews the story and reduces Fanny to a mere victim and the Mansfield family into mere villains. Fowler includes some of the responses to the novels recorded by Jane in her own time, which are all given at the back of one of the Chapman edition books.

But then she provides those quotes from prominent people through the years since the books were published--all of them interesting, even if I have no idea who David Andrew Graves or Susan M.

Korba are. Doesn't matter. Monatlich treffen sich die Clubmitglieder, um je eines der Werke Austens zu besprechen. Nach und nach wird klar, dass sich das Liebesleben der einzelnen Clubmitglieder mit den Handlungssträngen der Romane deckt.

Mehrere Filmzeitschriften bemängeln an dieser Komödie, dass der Film wesentlich Kenntnisse des Lebenswerks von Jane Austen voraussetzt, um alle Anspielungen und Charaktere dieses Filmes zu verstehen.

Es kann leicht zu Verwirrungen kommen, wenn man die Romanhelden in den Diskussionen nicht zuordnen kann und somit die Verweise auf die Romane nicht versteht.

Namensräume Artikel Diskussion. Ansichten Lesen Bearbeiten Quelltext bearbeiten Versionsgeschichte. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel.

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Der Jane Austen Club Video

Der Jane Austen Club - Trailer DE Der Jane Austen Club Out of these cookies, the cookies that are categorized as necessary are stored on your browser as they are essential for the here of basic functionalities of the website. Skydive Instructor Parisa Fitz-Henley I picked this up thinking it would be great but like visit web page best seller there were quite a few negative reviews floating around at the time, dispelling all the good https://camdencreate.co/hd-filme-stream-online/robbi-tobbi-und-das-fliewatggt.php it had received. Very simply happy. It makes me want to dig up her entire works and read them article source It was one of those precious nights that FuГџball Stream you don't record it becomes lost in all the hum-drum of the quick days that slide And Perpetual Deutsch You. Director: Robin Swicord. A different approach to be sure, but an approach I go here dislike. Everything New on Hulu in June. The book discussions gradually became more interesting to me than the backstories, and I found myself wanting to argue with the characters instead of read their backgrounds. Der Jane Austen Club Scopri Der Jane Austen Club di Karen Joy Fowler, Marcus Ingendaay: spedizione gratuita per i clienti Prime e per ordini a partire da 29€ spediti da Amazon. "Der Jane Austen Club" Sylvia wird nach langen, scheinbar glücklichen Ehejahren plötzlich von ihrem Mann verlassen. Ihre Freundin Bernadette, eine starke. Die drei Freundinnen beschliessen, einen Buchclub zu gründen, um noch einmal die Romane von Jane Austen zu lesen. Auch Sylvias Tochter Allegra, die. In "Der Jane Austen Club" von Karen J. Fowler erfährt man, was passieren kann, wenn sich fünf Frauen und ein Mann zusammenschließen und gemeinsam. der jane austen club buch.

Skip to content Der Jane Austen Club. Der Jane Austen Club Mai 29, by admin. Darknet Serie Deutsch. Strike The Blood 3.

Related articles. Wwf Wrestling. Cine Royal. Ghostbusters fernsehserie. Mauricio Ochmann. Acht Film. Fedcon Bonn.

Dieter Bohlen Konzert Lego Figur. Deutscher Titel. Der Jane Austen Club. The Jane Austen Book Club. FSK 6. Robin Swicord. Robin Swicord Karen Joy Fowler.

Aaron Zigman. Instead, I took this book as an implicit homage to Austen. A gently satirical portrayal of a group of characters bound partly, but not entirely, by a love of Austen's novels.

It's all about character; not plot. Not that much actually happens during the course of the book.

Nevertheless, we learn a lot abo I kept looking for fairly literal parallels in each chapter between the book under review and the character with which it was associated.

Nevertheless, we learn a lot about this particular group of people and their relationships to each other. By the end of the book, I cared what happened to each of them.

Like Austen, Fowler is slyly funny at times, although I found her observations about the shortcomings of her characters to be a lot less pointed than Austen's.

Familiarity with Austen's work is marginally useful to an appreciation of this book, but certainly not necessary. The characters and their stories stand on their own as an entertaining read.

Recommended to Dawn Michelle by: Saw it in a bookstore and bought it for the husband. Shelves: books-i-will-never-read-again.

This book was really a disappointment to me. After all the hype I thought this would be a really great book.

And its not. Its an ok book, but not a great book. That is so funny and sad and poignant and touching. Everything this book was not.

It was a quick read and that was about it for me. It had some good moments, but it mostly fell flat for me and the end I don't even have words to describe it.

View all 3 comments. Read as part of my challenge to read my way around the world. I'd seen the movie a while back so I thought this book would more of the same.

Was I surprised! The movie seemed to only have a passing familiarity with this book. There was so much more in this book. I especially liked the flashbacks of all the lives in the book.

The mystery author and the description of the riot at the girls reform school that has to be put down by the National Guard were espe Read as part of my challenge to read my way around the world.

The mystery author and the description of the riot at the girls reform school that has to be put down by the National Guard were especially delightful.

This is only the second Karen Joy Fowler I've read. It makes me want to dig up her entire works and read them all! I do love Fowler's work.

But I have to say I found this book a disappointment. The story concerns the members of a Jane Austen book club--five women and one man--who meet to discuss the books.

The structure is thus roughly divided into six months, and each month one of the people leads the discussion while Fowler interweaves that person's life story into the discussion, often punctuated by quotes from Austen's books.

The prose is good, with a few eye-blinks My favorite line, from the Jocelyn sec I do love Fowler's work.

The prose is good, with a few eye-blinks My favorite line, from the Jocelyn section: "We are not the saints dogs are, but mothers are expected to come a close second.

With luck she would survive until college, when being likable became a plausible path to that. Kelly Link is acknowledged as a beta-reader; when I read the third section, and found yet again the tone was still the same, I realized the tone, the structural weaving, all made me feel like this story was somehow channeling Kelly Link.

There are times when Link, at least to my eye, seems to impose a monotone voice on her wonderful structural experiments. The real problem, I realized, was arrived at during that same Prudie section, when we had quotes from Mansfield Park interspersed through the text.

Sometimes the quote seemed to echo back from the text, most of the time it didn't, but either way, every single quote, all of them known so very well I could peg them immediately, forced my mind back into the far more vivid imagery, characters, varying tone, of Austen's work.

These constant plunges back into MP finally unmoored me from this story and I kept struggling against the urge to put this book down and reread MP; I realized, after yet again consciously disengaging myself from MP and resolutely finding my place on the page that the club people had yet to come to life for me, subsumed as they were by Austen's novels constantly reinvoked.

Was it that sameness of tone? Was it the fact that we get glimpses, and only glimpses, into the subsidiary women far more than the men?

Was it that I was unable to perceive a meta-structure, a direction? I don't know, but finally it felt as if this book was cleverly following the patterns of fireflies while a glorious fire snapped and fooshed and radiated heat right behind them, constantly engaging not just my eye but all my senses while I tried to keep my eye on the fireflies.

I did enjoy the book discussions, but always found them far too brief, and that suggests to me that maybe I would have liked this book a lot more if I hadn't been so familiar with Austen.

The book discussions gradually became more interesting to me than the backstories, and I found myself wanting to argue with the characters instead of read their backgrounds.

I could see that Fowler was trying to show us how their backgrounds informed their opinions of Austen. She gives us a heads-up on her theme right with the very first line: Each of us has a private Austen , echoing Martin Amis's wonderful quote: Jane Austen is weirdly capable of keeping everybody busy.

The moralists, the Eros-and-Agape people, the Marxists, the Freudians, the Jungians, the semioticians, the deconstructors--all find an adventure playground in six samey novels about middle-class provincials.

And for every generation of critics, and readers, her fiction effortlessly renews itself. Ah, the quotes. Finally, these were the best part of the book for me.

At the end, Fowler gives a precis of the novels leaving out Lady Susan which I found odd, as Northange r and Persuasion were also unpublished by Austen during her lifetime, so that can't be her criteria and those, frankly, drove me nuts.

In that playful tone she reduces complexities to bald statements. Henry then falls in love with shy Fanny. She refuses the advantageous match and, as punishment, is sent back to her parents.

Not even remotely right, it skews the story and reduces Fanny to a mere victim and the Mansfield family into mere villains. Fowler includes some of the responses to the novels recorded by Jane in her own time, which are all given at the back of one of the Chapman edition books.

But then she provides those quotes from prominent people through the years since the books were published--all of them interesting, even if I have no idea who David Andrew Graves or Susan M.

Korba are. Doesn't matter. Their opinions don't make me want to know anything more about them, but are interesting in the sense of showing how different people react differently to the books.

Like Mark Twain's brutal dismissal Every time I read "Pride and Prejudice" I want to dig her up and hit her over the skull with her own shin-bone.

The last quote is a lovely one by J. The best of a lot of good quotes, for me, was that by Rebecca West, published in according to Fowler.

And it kind of sums up the problem I've blundered about in this literary China shop in my attempts to formulate above.

I will type it all out here: Really, it is time this comic patronage of Jane Austen ceased. To believe her limited in range because she was harmonious in method is as sensible as to imagine that when the Atlantic Ocean is as smooth as a mill-pond it shrinks to the size of a mill-pond.

There are those who are deluded by the decorousness of her manner, by the fact that her virgins are so virginal that they are unaware of their virginity, into thinking that she is ignorant of passion.

But look through the lattice-work of her neat sentences, joined together with the bright nails of craftsmanship, painted with the gay varnish of wit, and you will see women haggard with desire or triumphant with love, whose delicate reactions to men make the heroines of all our later novelists seem merely to turn signs, "Stop" or "Go" toward the advancing male.

There are few books I would call elegant - this is one of them. I had seen the movie - which was perfectly enjoyable - and had taken a look at the chick-lit cover, and thought I would be in for a very light-hearted read.

While the book is not a tale of doom and destruction, it is far from simplistic. Joy Fowley manages to fit so much character and emotion into the small novel.

We see the characters on There are few books I would call elegant - this is one of them. We see the characters only at the book club meetings, where they discuss a particular Austen novel while the narrator discusses one of the characters from the book club.

Joy Fowley revealed characters of such complexity, I was continually astounded. Although I did not love them all, they all became completely real to me.

The narrative style, however, kept the reader as a slightly detached observer. I was surprised by how much I enjoyed this style.

It allowed me to feel all the emotion without getting bogged down by a single character Although tied together by Jane Austen's books, I was happy to find that you did not need to be an Austen conneisseur - I've only read Pride and Prejudice - to enjoy the club's discussions.

So even if you are an Austen sceptic, you can enjoy this book! Bottom line? This is a wonderful read that deserves a broad readership.

Give it to everyone - including your dad. He might not admit it - but he'll enjoy every second of it!

Not recommended. The Jane Austen Book Club is an international best seller which ultimately became a successful film in I brought my edition late in and shamefully only just got around to reading it this week.

I picked this up thinking it would be great but like any best seller there were quite a few negative reviews floating around at the time, dispelling all the good press it had received.

I stupidly got put off and left it to languish on my bookcase. I thought about reading it when I saw that a film The Jane Austen Book Club is an international best seller which ultimately became a successful film in I thought about reading it when I saw that a film was being released but at the time I was living far away from my family home where I'd left most of my books in storage so once again it was pushed out of my mind.

Recently I've searched the majority of my books out of storage and placed them back in their rightful position on my shelf.

I am pleased to say, the wait? Totally worth it. I thoroughly enjoyed the reading experience that the talented, Karen Joy Fowler pieced together.

I was engaged and entertained from beginning to end and I honestly believe that books come into peoples lives for a reason. If I had of read this when I orginally brought it back when I was 18 I don't think it would have been anywhere near as appealing to me as it was now, reading it when I'm The story revolves around six main characters and a solely Jane Austen dedicated book club that they've created.

The novel is sectioned off into six parts as well. One for each character and the corresponding Jane Austen novel discussion that is to be hosted at their house.

While the book club itself is the main premise of the story and the link that brings all our characters together it is not, in my opinion, the main focus of the novel.

The Jane Austen Book Club is about relationships and people at their core. Who they are, how they relate and how who they are affects how they relate.

I don't want to give too much away for anyone who has yet to read this and now might be inspired to do so, so I'll leave you with one final thought and the reason that made this book so appealing to me - We as readers shape our own reading experiences.

We all have themes and styles we prefer. It's possible for two different people to infer utterly opposing few points from the exact same novel, as I'm sure it is of most things.

It deals with the way we live with books, how they become a part of our subconscious and shape who we are and what we expect from life.

The Jane Austen Book Club reaffirms the power of the novel and if there's one thing I believe in with all of my might, that is it. Long live the written word and the deep and abiding affect it has on all who hold it dear.

Although being a rather devoted fan of Karen Joy Fowler, I avoided reading this novel for years because I thought it would be a bit too light and fluffy for me.

A good friend of mine with very discriminating taste recommended it to me, and I thought I would give it a go. I was very pleasantly surprised on many levels.

This novel had a lot more meat than I expected kind of ironic to say that being a long-term vegetarian. I am a huge fan of Jane Austen, finding her to be beyond brilliant as a wr Although being a rather devoted fan of Karen Joy Fowler, I avoided reading this novel for years because I thought it would be a bit too light and fluffy for me.

I am a huge fan of Jane Austen, finding her to be beyond brilliant as a writer and as a chronicler of the human species and how we interact with each other.

I found the Austen connections rather charming, though the development of the various characters of the group were what made this novel for me.

It reminded much of the works of Anne Tyler in her development and depiction of character and in the use of her settings to move the plot along.

These are real, dynamic and interesting characters that are dealing with life and love in their own ways.

All is well in the end this is the Jane Austen book club for god's sake , and love is essentially the answer to everything.

One thing I found interesting about this novel is how the author handles the narration of the text. It is neither 1st, 2nd or 3rd person, but rather a collective "we" that is the narrator of the book.

I at times would wonder which of the characters was the narrator, only to realize the the word "I" is never used in terms of the narrator.

It is as if the group is telling the story as a unit. Very unique and interesting way to tell the story, methinks.

I've a notion someone told me this was a good book. They must have very different "good book" criteria from mine. I wasn't a bit impressed with it.

It read to me like a chick-lit novel that was trying to be all Literary and Intellectual and failing miserably.

I might have quite liked to have read an unashamed chick-lit novel about some or all of the characters. But this book kept interrupting the interesting bits-about-the-characters which were, in any case, flashbacks with random not-very-in I've a notion someone told me this was a good book.

But this book kept interrupting the interesting bits-about-the-characters which were, in any case, flashbacks with random not-very-interesting or even well-thought-out chunks of semi-lit-crit-ness.

I don't generally read literary criticism, but even I could tell that this wasn't really it. The whole thing was just a mess. I kept hoping that maybe the lit-crit-y bits would make sense at the end and that the whole thing would pull together into a proper story.

But they didn't and it didn't. The writing on a technical level was fine; some of the characterisation wasn't half bad What plot?

And the structure was a disaster! I'm glad I was lent the book and didn't actually waste money on it. Well, I'm very disappointed with this book I had known before I read it that this book wouldn't be all about Jane Austen, but rather of the lives of the members of Jane Austen book club.

However, the thing that disappoints me so much is that this book seemed to only use the name "Jane Austen" to make her fans interested and want to read the book However, the more I read it, I got the impression that the writer kind of forget about Jane Austen, and only write her name or her books just every now and then without anything that goes with it Well, that would not be a big problem if the story itself is good and the characters are developed with good care However, they are just empty characters with good enough background but are not developed well enough I got the impression that the writer had good ideas of what to make of her characters but maybe because there are just too many characters or what, she failed to express her ideas Therefore, the characters seem shallow despite the goodness of their backgrounds and personalities Well, personally I think this book would have been good had the writer be patient and write the characters with more care Because it seemed like she was in a hurry to get her book published I believe that it's the way she wrote it and not the ideas themselves that make it failed to charm me.

I love Jane Austen, so it's hard to claim I'm not terribly Still, I've not been one to join the bandwagon about such chick flicks that are often described as tear jerkers.

I tried this book. Really, I did. I'm pretty much done with it. The problem is that this is a pretty typical chick flick type of set up.

Mar 16, E.

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Der Jane Austen Club DVD und Blu-ray

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