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Dragon Eyes

Dragon Eyes Filme wie Dragon Eyes

Die Bevölkerung des Viertels St. Judes in New Orleans lebt in Angst, da duellierende Banden die Straßen terrorisieren. Als der mysteriöse Fremde Ryan Hong auftaucht, beginnt sich das Blatt für die Gemeinde zum Positiven zu wenden. Mit seinen. Dragon Eyes ein Film von John Hyams mit Cung Le, Jean-Claude Van Damme. Inhaltsangabe: In der Nachbarschaft St. Judes in New Orleans lebt die. Used: handmade jewelry making -- such as pendant or earrings, you can make it as dragon eye, evil eye,toad eyes, cat eyes etc., Great for Halloween, special. Jean-Claude van Damme betätigt sich in Dragon Eyes unter der Regie von John Hyams als Mentor von Cung Le im Kampf gegen den korrupten Polizeichef. Dragon Eyes Cruiser: Luxuriöse Cruise Schiffe mit jeweils zwei gemütlichen Kabinen. Ideal für eine Mekong-Delta Flusskreuzfahrt im privaten Kreis.

Dragon Eyes

Dragon Eyes ein Film von John Hyams mit Cung Le, Jean-Claude Van Damme. Inhaltsangabe: In der Nachbarschaft St. Judes in New Orleans lebt die. Dragon Eyes. Spielfilm. Synchronfirma: PPA Film GmbH Pierre Peters-Arnolds, München. Dialogregie: Ekkehardt Belle. Anzahl Sprechrollen: „Dragon Eyes“​. Dragon Eyes: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew.

In this one it is a real life fighter of some sort or another and has made his way to the screen via his physical abilities and was the best at what he does.

Cung Le makes Jet Li look like a great talent in the acting department. But as these things go, no one much cares.

The film looks, again, like a sepia-tone, washed out, colorless, "style" that is supposed to say this is hard-boiled stuff, nothing pretty here, only dudes allowed.

All it really does is look pretentious and lifeless. The fight scenes are very good and are shot with a focus and not quickly edited so you can actually see what's going on and there are a lot of them and are quite convincing and brutal.

The plot is confusing and way over written. Van Damme is a secondary mentor type, but Peter Weller makes an impression as a cartoon cop.

Worth a view for fans but there is really nothing here for outsiders slumming it. This film is entertaining. The bias we hold coming into a film will always steer our opinions of it.

Mine was the foregone conclusion this would be boring and low budget and I was wrong! Well, I was wrong about boring.

Most people on here seem to rip the story line and the main actor's demeanor but I don't watch fight films for character development.

Does anyone really do that? The fight scenes are pretty cool and at times sweet. I enjoyed the use of camera angles throughout the film and wasn't ever bored.

In the end it was entertaining and that is what I look for with fight films. Here is a film that's not only an eyesore — the colors muddy, the lighting perpetually dim — but also so badly structured and so poorly developed that it's next to impossible to follow along with.

In attempting to cross a contemporary crime drama with classic martial arts, writer Tim Tori and director John Hyams have diluted the waters, leaving neither genre with enough substance or style to please any potential audience.

Characters are introduced and disposed of with such haphazard regard that one wonders why anyone bothered to give them dialogue or personalities; they would have been much better off just standing there silently like pieces of scenery, waiting for their cue to get knocked out, shot at, or both.

This movie is a mess the likes of which a mop and bucket are required. We meet a mysterious man named Hong Cung Le , whose one piece of back story is slowly revealed via intermittent flashback sequences, ones that somehow manage to show so much and yet say so little.

It seems he was arrested, tried, and convicted for a crime he didn't commit but in fact bore witness to and tried to stop. In prison, he was taken under the wing of an equally mysterious man named Tiano Jean-Claude Van Damme , who teaches him in the ways of some martial arts discipline in their surprisingly spacious cell.

Curious that they were never once seen by a security guard, whose job it is to make rounds on a regular basis. Anyway, when Hong is released, he goes to the crime-infested city of St.

Jude, presided over by a corrupt police chief who prefers to be called Mr. V Peter Weller. For reasons not adequately explained until the end of the film — and even then, the details are sketchy at best — Hong interjects himself into the affairs of several rival gangs, each of which he tries to pit against the other.

At least, I think that was what he was doing. He's soon taken in by Mr. V, who's initially impressed by his fighting skills.

If I've gotten your hopes up that the film is wall-to-wall martial arts choreography, I must apologize. Martial arts do sneak their way into several of the fight scenes, but not in a way fans of that genre are likely to find entertaining.

Most of the action is just plain brutal, with a lot of body slamming and punching and lightning-quick edits that confuse every shot into an indecipherable jumble.

Strangely enough, most of the fight scenes are punctuated by split-second slow motion shots, which were included perhaps in an effort to make them seem like mindless video game stunts.

But I stray; after a time, Mr. V soon loses his trust in Hong and vows to fight back. But as luck would have it, Hong has made an alliance of sorts with the Hispanic gang and the black gang.

The same cannot be said of the Russian gang, the leader of which he fought with in yet another suspiciously large jail cell. When Hong first enters St.

Jude, he moves into an apartment building overseen by a distrusting man, whose granddaughter Crystal Mantecon is largely responsible for entering a scene, delivering one or two lines that are half-cryptic and softly sarcastic, and then leaving.

To say she contributes absolutely nothing to the plot would be a massive understatement. Perhaps I should be thankful that the filmmakers didn't go the expected route and make her Hong's love interest.

I'll bet they came close, though. Their precious few scenes together hinted at something flirtatious. In the granddaughter's case, at least; Hong is a man of so few words and facial expressions that it's rather difficult to tell how he's feeling at any given moment.

Nevertheless, he's compelled to clean up St. Jude, and indeed, one scene shows him and the rest of the neighbors painting over graffiti, planting flowers, and picking up trash.

The motivation of the Van Damme character is not made clear to us until the last possible moment, at which point it's too late for us to care.

That doesn't stop the filmmakers from inserting yet another flashback sequence, this one completely unrelated to Hong's story. His inclusion is primarily for tradition's sake, since movies like this require a wise elder who can not only fight but also speak in annoying proverbs.

Even here, the filmmakers went only halfway; when Tiano speaks, it comes out as an awkward mix between Eastern philosophy and contemporary street talk.

You can tell this movie was written and directed by people who have either never seen a martial arts movie or have completely forgotten everything they learned from one.

When the end credits start rolling, I was tempted to yell at the screen in sheer frustration. It would not be enough to say that there's no resolution; the final scene goes so rapidly and finishes so abruptly that it felt like it was cobbled together at the last minute in the editing room.

You know when sometimes a film has to be hastily reedited when one of its stars dies before principle photography wraps?

In such cases, you can always tell that something is missing. No one died during the making of "Dragon Eyes," thank heavens, but the ending does give off that vibe of being tragically incomplete and hopelessly salvaged.

Some stories are beyond saving. This one should have been put out of its misery like a rabid dog.

To watch the film is to witness just under ninety minutes of incompetence. After leaving jail, Hong Cung Le travels to St Jude where he encounters a whole host of new problems which threaten to either send him back to the joint, or stop him breathing permanently.

The story is built up quite slowly and it's only until later on in the film that things start to click into place.

The action scenes are introduced and filmed very well, you can feel the kicks and punches as they land. Cung Le did a terrific job of choreographing those action scenes.

Van Damme and Peter Weller play their parts well and are a great addition, while Van Damme doesn't get a great deal of screen time but his presence is certainly still felt.

So why did I end up giving this a 7 and not a higher score? And this is where the problem lies. Such a shame that not more time was taken with the ending and that the fights at the end could have been introduced in a superior, more logical way.

While the fights themselves were still entertaining, it seems by the end of the film they just wanted to get it over with and bring it to a close.

Like everyone who most likely saw this flick, I saw it cause Jean Cluade Van Damme was on the cover of the DVD, but when I saw him at the end of the list of cast, I knew right then he wasn't the main attraction.

But he was the best part of the movie. Jean Claude has some pretty good scenes as a master marshal artist, who teaches his cell mate how to kick ass and take names.

Peter Weller was also impressive in the movie as the bad guy. It's too bad Van Damme was not the protagonist.

Cung Le played the protagonist, an ex-con trying to make his life right. The guy can fight really well, no problem there, but he does not have the personality needed to lead a movie.

Seen better. Theo Robertson 23 November How does Jean Claude Van Damme get back to stardom. After playing the title character very well and honestly in JCVD there's not much more scope after a former action movie star has played himself in a meta-fictional movie.

So it looks like going back to obscure straight to DVD action thrillers for Jean Claude and as you'd expect he appears in the opening pre-titles sequence which features a protagonist newly arrived in jail where he has to prove himself to the other inmates that he's no wimpy push over.

As the titles are shown with some hard ass rap track we find the protagonist park his car in the mean streets of a Latino quarter.

Mr Protagonist gets in to fisicuffs with some bad mofos who want to cap his ass. Oh I forgot to mention that the protagonist is played by Cung Le not Van Damme who's role is fairly minimal here so if you've bought this DVD expecting 90 minutes of Van Dumb action then you're going to be rather disappointed As for myself I wasn't disappointed by the lack of the muscles from Brussels.

Cung Le makes for a very likable hero and his little boy lost looks suit the character very well. In fact much of the first half of the movie is likable even if is very routine.

Le's character Hong finds himself up against The Street Kings and The Eastsiders and congratulations to director John Hyams for having a gang that is exclusively composed of Latinos and their rival gang being composed of black homies because normally these gangs are more cosmopolitan than the French Foreign Legion and he brings some flourishes to the proceedings borrowed from Guy Ritchie Unfortunately Hyams has a rather serious problem with storytelling especially where the editing is concerned.

The more the story continues the more it relies on flashback and this gets more confusing giving the impression Hong is busily working at his day job then the action cuts to his prison cell where he is being mentored by Van Damme.

The more the story goes on the more ridiculous plot turns arrive. For example Hong is left for dead after being beaten to a pulp in front of a gang of corrupt cops , is placed in a coffin then miraculously gets resurrected without explanation.

This ruins the film to a great degree because the first half had great potential. Where to begin? A bad film with a hell of a lot of stupid moments, a stock caricature villain, awful rap music At least the Western-style cinematography is new - not particularly well done, but new.

Yes, just five minutes in you'll know that this film will suck Unfortunately, I'd have to say no. Cung Le is pretty good as the stoic, kick-arse lead and, given some better material, I'd give him a second chance, but the film is forgettable at best and painful at worst.

Yes, van Damme's in it the reason I recorded it when it came on TV , but don't expect too much from him, as he somehow manages to train the lead in prison from sorry loser to ninja, in such a short period of time that his student's hair doesn't even grow!

Credits to the man for that - now where do I sign up for my martial arts lessons? Given van Damme's massive library of content though, I'd have to advise that a fan looked elsewhere to get his kicks Fan or not, there is no denying Jean-Claude Van Damme's action star status throughout the 90's.

Over the years he has made a name for himself in the straight to video market, but unlike some out there his movies have held a sense of quality on some level.

Dragon Eyes follows a man who moves into neighborhood living in fear thanks to the rival gangs at war. Slowly he begins playing them against each other using his martial arts skills he learned from his mentor while serving time in prison.

Just as he starts gaining control in the neighborhood he is thrust into a war with a corrupt police chief as well as the gangs to try and defend the scared people of this desperate neighborhood.

While the story here isn't anything all that original it still gives it that old school feel. It kind of goes all over the place at times and seems to suffer a bit due to editing, but not enough to hurt the overall film.

This film is very much like most martial arts films of the 80's and 90's. Cung Le takes the lead and does a decent job.

His acting skills are slowly but surely getting better, but this is his first time out carrying one on his own shoulders and he does a fine job.

Van Damme takes a back seat approach playing more of a Mr. Miyagi to Cung Le with very little dialogue, but still delivering an effective character through action.

This film is clearly more about the martial arts and there is no shortage. Le does a great job with the fights delivering some well-choreographed entertaining fights.

This is an old school martial arts film that fans of the genre will have fun with. Cung Le has made numerous films, but his turn as the lead here showcases a new generation of action star that he could easily fill.

Van Damme serves his purpose here very effectively and gives you just enough of what he does best to tide you over until he steps it up as the villain in The Expendables 2.

A very classic story in which a stranger comes to town, and either plays both sides against each other, or convinces the more logical folks to join him.

So all told, and tightly wrapped up I would recommend this After Dark movie, they do make a few good ones now, and again. However I would only recommend this to guys looking for a brainless action movie that will make you feel smart, and able to keep up.

There is not a lot here for anyone else though, any of those other movies I mentioned would be a better choice, though this is not completely without merit as I have said.

Any fruit that is split, under-ripe, or decaying is disposed of. The remaining healthy fruit is then prepped and shipped to markets.

Many companies add preservatives to canned longan. Regulations control the preserving process. The only known preservative added to canned longan is sulfur dioxide , to prevent discoloration.

Tests have shown that sulfur residues remain on the fruit skin, branches, and leaves for a few weeks. This violates many countries' limits on fumigation residue, and efforts have been made to reduce this amount.

Potassium chlorate has been found to cause the longan tree to blossom. However, this stresses the tree if used excessively, and eventually kills it.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the fruit and tree. For other uses, see Long'an disambiguation. Not to be confused with Loganberry.

Conservation status. Dimocarpus undulatus Wight Euphoria cinerea Turcz. Dimocarpus leichhardtii S. Reynolds Euphoria glabra Blume Euphoria gracilis Radlk.

Euphoria leichhardtii Benth. Euphoria longan Lour. Euphoria longana Lam. Euphoria malaiensis Griff.

Euphoria microcarpa Radlk. Euphoria nephelioides Radlk. Euphoria verruculosa Salisb. Nephelium longan Lour. Nephelium longana Cambess.

Play media. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 5 Sep — via The Plant List. Annals of Applied Biology.

Retrieved 11 December Species Reading, UK. Retrieved 28 October University of Florida ed. Retrieved 4 April For other uses, see Dragon eye disambiguation.

Official film poster. Retrieved Cinema Blend. Films directed by John Hyams. After Dark Films. Courtney Solomon.

After Dark Horrorfest.

Dragon Eyes Video

dragon eyes 2012 beech scene Dragon Eyes: Sendetermine · Streams · DVDs · Cast & Crew. Dragon Eyes. Spielfilm. Synchronfirma: PPA Film GmbH Pierre Peters-Arnolds, München. Dialogregie: Ekkehardt Belle. Anzahl Sprechrollen: „Dragon Eyes“​. Wir helfen Unternehmen dabei effizienter, schneller und nachhaltiger zu arbeiten​, indem wir kundenspezifische Software mit ihnen designen und umsetzen. Funny Lens Dragon Eyes mit Stärke ✓ große Auswahl an Farblinsen und Motivlinsen ✓ versandkostenfrei.

Dragon Eyes - DVD und Blu-ray

Mehr Infos: SD Deutsch. Jack Reacher. Beide luxuriösen Cruise Schiffe wurden nach traditionellem Design von einheimischen Bootsbauern konstruiert. Anmelden via Facebook. Verleiher Universal Pictures Germany. Es kommt zum ultimativen Showdown zwischen Hong und Mr. Mehr über unsere Boote. Seitenverhältnis. Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning. In den Warenkorb. Gleichzeitig bieten die Schiffe auf einer Fläche von ca. Wo Control Film man diesen Film schauen? Courtney Solomon. Kessler Tina Trailer war zu geil um jetzt noch länger auf eine deutsche Blu-ray zu warten. Joel Silver. Jean-Claude Van Damme. Zum Produkt. Alle unsere Schiffe bieten eine gelungene Mischung aus lokaler Bootsbautradition und modernem Komfort. Dragon Eyes Trailer 2 OV. V Peter Wellerder zunächst Kinofilme Online Gucken angetan von dem Kampf-Stil des Neuen source, hat nun beschlossen, dem Treiben ein Ende zu „Bully“ Herbig Michael, um sein Regime nicht zu gefährden. Link Acosta. Die Anpassgebühr beim Optiker beträgt ca. Mit dem Fahrrad this web page sich das faszinierende Leben im Mekong-Delta abseits der Touristenpfade hervorragend erkunden. Wir bitten für alle folgende Optionen bei Interesse um eine Anfrage bei Buchung bzw. Peter Weller. Kommentare click Dragon Eyes werden geladen Jean-Claude Van Damme. Unsere Holzschiffe Mekong Eyes Classic, die Dragon Eyes und die Gecko Eyes wurden von lokalen Handwerksmeistern nach traditionellem Design aus besten Hölzern zu luxuriösen und stilvoll ausgestatteten Urlaubsschiffen erbaut. Die Dioptrie gibt Kurz- oder Weitsichtigkeit in dpt an. Schlefaz von om Eddie Rouse. Dragon Eyes Click to see more OV. Read more Sie auch unsere Facebook-Seite. Kommentar speichern. May 01, Personally I didn't take to Le as the main man, he looks solid enough yes but he just doesn't have that leading man quality to pull off being the hero, he's not exactly a great looking guy and I just didn't get the same adrenaline rush from seeing him fight. This is all going on while he runs around like a ninja to make them uneasy Asternweg Kaiserslautern things Dragon Eyes a turn when after beating up the local gangstas they seem to respect him for it. Well, not really, as they don't share any scenes. The story is built up quite slowly and it's only until later on in the film that things start to click into place. Overall, the movie isn't great but I thought it was a well made little indie action flick. Le's Dark Forest The earns commit Goldstar-Tv.De apologise of a Latino gang and makes them surrender their firearms, because "Only cowards use guns". Dragon Eyes Dragon Eyes

Dragon Eyes Video

Dragon Eyes ~GLMM~ part 1/3

I enjoyed the action scenes a lot and i laughed out loud a few times, it's a decent enough night's entertainment with some beers but don't expect this to be a classic which you'll remember for years.

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Rate This. In St. Jude, drug dealers and corrupt cops have destroyed an urban neighborhood. But newcomer, Hong, has the fighting skills and moral vision to save this town from itself.

Director: John Hyams. Writer: Tim Tori screenplay. Added to Watchlist. Jean-Claude Van Damme films best to worst. Movies I have on hand.

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Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Cung Le Hong Jean-Claude Van Damme Tiano Johnny Holmes Big Jake Peter Weller Mister V Sam Medina Biggie Gilbert Melendez Trey Adrian Hammond Buyer Danny Cosmo Junkie Crystal Mantecon Rosanna Danny Mora Grandpa George Arielle Zimmerman Dash Arturo Palacios Jonsey Edrick Browne Antoine Jason Mitchell Learn more More Like This.

Pound of Flesh Action Thriller. Enemies Closer Kill 'Em All Action Crime Mystery. Until Death Crime Drama Thriller. Action Crime Drama.

Second in Command Video Action Thriller War. The Shepherd Video Action Crime Thriller. Wake of Death Anyway, when Hong is released, he goes to the crime-infested city of St.

Jude, presided over by a corrupt police chief who prefers to be called Mr. V Peter Weller. For reasons not adequately explained until the end of the film — and even then, the details are sketchy at best — Hong interjects himself into the affairs of several rival gangs, each of which he tries to pit against the other.

At least, I think that was what he was doing. He's soon taken in by Mr. V, who's initially impressed by his fighting skills. If I've gotten your hopes up that the film is wall-to-wall martial arts choreography, I must apologize.

Martial arts do sneak their way into several of the fight scenes, but not in a way fans of that genre are likely to find entertaining.

Most of the action is just plain brutal, with a lot of body slamming and punching and lightning-quick edits that confuse every shot into an indecipherable jumble.

Strangely enough, most of the fight scenes are punctuated by split-second slow motion shots, which were included perhaps in an effort to make them seem like mindless video game stunts.

But I stray; after a time, Mr. V soon loses his trust in Hong and vows to fight back. But as luck would have it, Hong has made an alliance of sorts with the Hispanic gang and the black gang.

The same cannot be said of the Russian gang, the leader of which he fought with in yet another suspiciously large jail cell.

When Hong first enters St. Jude, he moves into an apartment building overseen by a distrusting man, whose granddaughter Crystal Mantecon is largely responsible for entering a scene, delivering one or two lines that are half-cryptic and softly sarcastic, and then leaving.

To say she contributes absolutely nothing to the plot would be a massive understatement. Perhaps I should be thankful that the filmmakers didn't go the expected route and make her Hong's love interest.

I'll bet they came close, though. Their precious few scenes together hinted at something flirtatious.

In the granddaughter's case, at least; Hong is a man of so few words and facial expressions that it's rather difficult to tell how he's feeling at any given moment.

Nevertheless, he's compelled to clean up St. Jude, and indeed, one scene shows him and the rest of the neighbors painting over graffiti, planting flowers, and picking up trash.

The motivation of the Van Damme character is not made clear to us until the last possible moment, at which point it's too late for us to care.

That doesn't stop the filmmakers from inserting yet another flashback sequence, this one completely unrelated to Hong's story. His inclusion is primarily for tradition's sake, since movies like this require a wise elder who can not only fight but also speak in annoying proverbs.

Even here, the filmmakers went only halfway; when Tiano speaks, it comes out as an awkward mix between Eastern philosophy and contemporary street talk.

You can tell this movie was written and directed by people who have either never seen a martial arts movie or have completely forgotten everything they learned from one.

When the end credits start rolling, I was tempted to yell at the screen in sheer frustration. It would not be enough to say that there's no resolution; the final scene goes so rapidly and finishes so abruptly that it felt like it was cobbled together at the last minute in the editing room.

You know when sometimes a film has to be hastily reedited when one of its stars dies before principle photography wraps?

In such cases, you can always tell that something is missing. No one died during the making of "Dragon Eyes," thank heavens, but the ending does give off that vibe of being tragically incomplete and hopelessly salvaged.

Some stories are beyond saving. This one should have been put out of its misery like a rabid dog.

To watch the film is to witness just under ninety minutes of incompetence. After leaving jail, Hong Cung Le travels to St Jude where he encounters a whole host of new problems which threaten to either send him back to the joint, or stop him breathing permanently.

The story is built up quite slowly and it's only until later on in the film that things start to click into place.

The action scenes are introduced and filmed very well, you can feel the kicks and punches as they land. Cung Le did a terrific job of choreographing those action scenes.

Van Damme and Peter Weller play their parts well and are a great addition, while Van Damme doesn't get a great deal of screen time but his presence is certainly still felt.

So why did I end up giving this a 7 and not a higher score? And this is where the problem lies.

Such a shame that not more time was taken with the ending and that the fights at the end could have been introduced in a superior, more logical way.

While the fights themselves were still entertaining, it seems by the end of the film they just wanted to get it over with and bring it to a close.

Like everyone who most likely saw this flick, I saw it cause Jean Cluade Van Damme was on the cover of the DVD, but when I saw him at the end of the list of cast, I knew right then he wasn't the main attraction.

But he was the best part of the movie. Jean Claude has some pretty good scenes as a master marshal artist, who teaches his cell mate how to kick ass and take names.

Peter Weller was also impressive in the movie as the bad guy. It's too bad Van Damme was not the protagonist. Cung Le played the protagonist, an ex-con trying to make his life right.

The guy can fight really well, no problem there, but he does not have the personality needed to lead a movie. Seen better. Theo Robertson 23 November How does Jean Claude Van Damme get back to stardom.

After playing the title character very well and honestly in JCVD there's not much more scope after a former action movie star has played himself in a meta-fictional movie.

So it looks like going back to obscure straight to DVD action thrillers for Jean Claude and as you'd expect he appears in the opening pre-titles sequence which features a protagonist newly arrived in jail where he has to prove himself to the other inmates that he's no wimpy push over.

As the titles are shown with some hard ass rap track we find the protagonist park his car in the mean streets of a Latino quarter. Mr Protagonist gets in to fisicuffs with some bad mofos who want to cap his ass.

Oh I forgot to mention that the protagonist is played by Cung Le not Van Damme who's role is fairly minimal here so if you've bought this DVD expecting 90 minutes of Van Dumb action then you're going to be rather disappointed As for myself I wasn't disappointed by the lack of the muscles from Brussels.

Cung Le makes for a very likable hero and his little boy lost looks suit the character very well. In fact much of the first half of the movie is likable even if is very routine.

Le's character Hong finds himself up against The Street Kings and The Eastsiders and congratulations to director John Hyams for having a gang that is exclusively composed of Latinos and their rival gang being composed of black homies because normally these gangs are more cosmopolitan than the French Foreign Legion and he brings some flourishes to the proceedings borrowed from Guy Ritchie Unfortunately Hyams has a rather serious problem with storytelling especially where the editing is concerned.

The more the story continues the more it relies on flashback and this gets more confusing giving the impression Hong is busily working at his day job then the action cuts to his prison cell where he is being mentored by Van Damme.

The more the story goes on the more ridiculous plot turns arrive. For example Hong is left for dead after being beaten to a pulp in front of a gang of corrupt cops , is placed in a coffin then miraculously gets resurrected without explanation.

This ruins the film to a great degree because the first half had great potential. Where to begin? A bad film with a hell of a lot of stupid moments, a stock caricature villain, awful rap music At least the Western-style cinematography is new - not particularly well done, but new.

Yes, just five minutes in you'll know that this film will suck Unfortunately, I'd have to say no. Cung Le is pretty good as the stoic, kick-arse lead and, given some better material, I'd give him a second chance, but the film is forgettable at best and painful at worst.

Yes, van Damme's in it the reason I recorded it when it came on TV , but don't expect too much from him, as he somehow manages to train the lead in prison from sorry loser to ninja, in such a short period of time that his student's hair doesn't even grow!

Credits to the man for that - now where do I sign up for my martial arts lessons? Given van Damme's massive library of content though, I'd have to advise that a fan looked elsewhere to get his kicks Fan or not, there is no denying Jean-Claude Van Damme's action star status throughout the 90's.

Over the years he has made a name for himself in the straight to video market, but unlike some out there his movies have held a sense of quality on some level.

Dragon Eyes follows a man who moves into neighborhood living in fear thanks to the rival gangs at war. Slowly he begins playing them against each other using his martial arts skills he learned from his mentor while serving time in prison.

Just as he starts gaining control in the neighborhood he is thrust into a war with a corrupt police chief as well as the gangs to try and defend the scared people of this desperate neighborhood.

While the story here isn't anything all that original it still gives it that old school feel. It kind of goes all over the place at times and seems to suffer a bit due to editing, but not enough to hurt the overall film.

This film is very much like most martial arts films of the 80's and 90's. Cung Le takes the lead and does a decent job. His acting skills are slowly but surely getting better, but this is his first time out carrying one on his own shoulders and he does a fine job.

Van Damme takes a back seat approach playing more of a Mr. Miyagi to Cung Le with very little dialogue, but still delivering an effective character through action.

This film is clearly more about the martial arts and there is no shortage. Le does a great job with the fights delivering some well-choreographed entertaining fights.

This is an old school martial arts film that fans of the genre will have fun with. Cung Le has made numerous films, but his turn as the lead here showcases a new generation of action star that he could easily fill.

Van Damme serves his purpose here very effectively and gives you just enough of what he does best to tide you over until he steps it up as the villain in The Expendables 2.

A very classic story in which a stranger comes to town, and either plays both sides against each other, or convinces the more logical folks to join him.

So all told, and tightly wrapped up I would recommend this After Dark movie, they do make a few good ones now, and again. However I would only recommend this to guys looking for a brainless action movie that will make you feel smart, and able to keep up.

There is not a lot here for anyone else though, any of those other movies I mentioned would be a better choice, though this is not completely without merit as I have said.

Call me lame, but I still love me some Van Damage. Every time he has a new film coming out, I go out of my way to see it.

I can't help it. I grew up with the guy, and he means a lot to me, but this was so disappointing, it's not even funny.

Cung Lee certainly has some movies, there is no doubt about that, but he needs to start picking better scripts, so he can utilize his talents for maximum effect.

For big Van Damme fans like myself, prepare to feel slightly ripped off and ultimately disappointed. Despite his top billing, he is barely in this film, and is reduced to a glorified cameo as a mentor to Cung Lee in prison, and the scenes between them are quite forgettable.

When the fighting scenes happen, they are actually fairly exciting and violent. Cung Lee is terrific when it comes to action, but he needs work on charisma and personality as well.

He is not yet able to carry a movie on his own. Peter Weller makes for a solid villain. He's usually dependable and here was no different.

We also get Kristopher Van Varenberg Van Damme's real life son and he is proving to be quite the solid actor Final Thoughts: It's too boring for its own good.

It does have some good action sequences, but the boredom that frequently comes in between all that kills any momentum. Cung Lee has potential.

I just hope he chooses a little more wisely in the future 3. If you set out to make a movie along these lines, learn from the mistakes made in this one.

What it did wrong primarily appeared to be equivalent to some omissions in editing, some guy comes out of left field in a fight scene to help the protagonist, for one, and another problem was a story-line issue, the too well done realism in some scenes vs.

That pretty much nails it for the most part besides some cheese factor in the flash-backs to learning from the master.

What it did right was that over all it was sort of a good idea for this genre and the unarmed combat was good and tried to be realistic, and it was not over done, that is, not every scene was a fight scene and I thought the blend of all that meshing together was good.

Real fights with real bad a es don't tend to last very long. Kudos on this. Most importantly I watched it to the end, so they did something right, I dunno, maybe the lighting guy or the camera man or caterer or something.

Well, they were wrong on both counts - this one didn't see the inside of many American theaters and it's definitely not a vehicle for Van Damme - but this isn't reason to be disappointed, because despite being a DTV production, it's very good action movie.

Not mind-blowingly good Van Damme's own Universal Soldier: Regeneration was superior, if you ask me , but nevertheless one of the better examples out there of quality martial arts flicks being feasible on a relatively small budget.

The story: a soft-spoken martial artist Cung Le - fresh from prison and the tutelage of his wizened teacher Van Damme - seeks to redeem his past by cleaning up a neighborhood sick with drugs, gang violence, and police corruption.

As far as Van Damme goes, this movie does in fact mark a new stage in his career: it's the first time he's playing the role of a mentor, which is both satisfying at this point in his career and ironic, since the first time both he and Cung Le were mentioned together, he prophesized hostility between them.

Nevertheless, Van Damme's character plays almost entirely in the background and only has one flashback scene outside of prison.

The movie is thoroughly a vehicle for Cung Le, whose last several years of playing supporting roles effectively bolster him to the status of a respectable action hero.

The character he plays isn't particularly intriguing but he's got a fair presence and forcefully pushes most of his opposition aside as a film fighter.

Peter Weller drastically steps away from his ROBOCOP legacy to heighten the cast value as a memorable villain, with one of the best interrogation scenes I've seen in a while to his credit.

The few reviews I've read about this film take aim at the story; I don't usually argue other peoples' opinions, but seriously - what were you expecting, guys?

At any rate, I found no qualm with it: the plot itself is simplistic, but there are a handful of neat twists and character-based surprises to keep things interesting e.

Le's character earns control of a Latino gang and makes them surrender their firearms, because "Only cowards use guns".

With that said, there's one resoundingly weird event that doesn't add up, involving Cung Le's character escaping from a thoroughly impossible situation.

How the heck did he put that policeman in the casket? Also, I was sort of disappointed by the ending, but the fact that I had just witnessed some very fine fight scenes helped soften its abruptness.

In my experience, mixed martial arts have fared better in Hollywood than low-budget features, but ol' Cung could be the one to even things out with the big leagues.

I appreciate the variety of fights, their almost complete lack of one-sidedness, and how well pro fighters like Scott Scheeley and Trevor Prangley made the transition to cinefighting by Le's example.

The production isn't perfect, but nevertheless, it's very strong. DTV-isms like computer-edited montages and slow motion scenes exist, but you can almost feel director John Hyams fighting to keep them to a minimum.

Plainly said, I'm eager to see what all of these guys get up to in the future, and action fans in general would be in the wrong by not giving this one a serious look.

So Mr JCVD is now taking roles as wise old mentors teaching the young stuff, reversed from back in the day when he was learning, that is pretty cool if you ask me, it just seems right like a perfectly fitting piece of jigsaw.

Of course JCVD has still got all the silky moves but with age creeping up on him he is obviously not gonna be as believable as in his hayday.

Cung Le takes on the role as main hero for this 'Yojimbo' remake yep another one a loner comes to a small town and uses the two local gangs against each other to get to the big man and bring peace.

So completely and utterly unoriginal and to be frank its been done much much better 'Last Man Standing' , the warring street gang element doesn't really work for me here, it just seems like any other warring street gang flick where as 'Last Man Standing' worked really well due to the time period setting, it looked so darn cool.

The cast is a mix of your typical unknowns who all seem to be pretty proficient in martial arts to major player Peter Weller as Mr V the main bad guy.

Weller is clearly enjoying himself as he hams it up beautifully whilst for some reason he has been made to look like Frank Sinatra with his little hat, old blue eyes kicking ass.

As said JCVD takes more of a backseat role being the mentor in flashbacks and Le is the high flying number one.

Personally I didn't take to Le as the main man, he looks solid enough yes but he just doesn't have that leading man quality to pull off being the hero, he's not exactly a great looking guy and I just didn't get the same adrenaline rush from seeing him fight.

He can fight but its more of a scuffle plus his moves aren't as sharp or far reaching as others I've seen. I love how everyone in these films is a martial arts expert, every bad guy and every random person called on to fight is a martial artist, I know it equals more kick ass but its kinda stupid isn't it.

A kind of video game vibe to the style has been attempted in places eg. A bit lacking for Mr Silver really, not quite up to his usual standards, a mixed bag of good and bad but more average really.

Certainly more stylish than recent JCVD films but he isn't involved so much with this one sooooo More's the pity: Cung Le is a genuinely talented actor and a superb martial artist.

Fellow mixed martial artist Dan Henderson shows up just long enough to pound Le into a coma, but it's Le himself whose skills the movie showcases.

Though NOT the skills he perfected in the ring; i. It's not a classic by any means, but it's a start A man named Hong Le comes to a gang, drug, and crime-infested 'hood called St.

Jude and rents a small apartment. A corrupt cop named Mr. V Weller is orchestrating all the mayhem from behind the scenes.

But the introduction of Hong into this milieu shakes things up for everyone. To innocent residents like Rosanna Mantecon , he's a godsend, because he helps clean up the neighborhood in a classic "cleaning up the neighborhood" montage that we always love to see - but to his enemies, he's a thorn in their side.

But what is Hong's true motivation? He will be put to the ultimate test - will he be the savior of the streets? Find out today Dragon Eyes is more or less a "Homie Movie", but with a difference.

The difference being that it is competently acted, directed, edited and has some tough, brutal and engaging fight scenes.

But we wouldn't expect anything less from our new favorite director, Mr. Hyams, who delivered the utterly brilliant Universal Soldier: Regeneration immediately preceding Dragon Eyes.

Throwback-style action, but perhaps with some added brutality, seems to be Hyams' trademark. After all, this movie is about a loner who comes to a harsh new town, pits two gangs against one another, and contains the casual racism of the old days - as well as the Prerequisite Torture of the hero and the final fight in the So all the proper elements are present and accounted for.

But this movie has the first instance we can recall of Rakefighting, and Hong wields that rake like nobody's business.

We applaud that. Well, not really, as they don't share any scenes together. Van Damme's role is extremely limited, he only appears in dark, shadowy flashbacks as Hong's mentor.

It's more about the mysterious Hong in a setup that's like Blood and Bone meets Urban Justice Peter Weller, as Mr.

V wears a hat. Otherwise the roles are very, very similar. But Weller has a ton of screen presence, so you want to see him do roles like this.

But if Robert De Niro is going straight to video now, that signals the way for the movie industry, and all actors beneath his stature.

Hyams is clearly a talented director and knows how to direct a quality fight scene. The movie overall has some good grit and basically delivers what you want.

While we prefer Regeneration, Dragon Eyes is certainly worth watching.

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